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P-40 Tomahawk Tex Hill (signed on base plate) 

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$499.95
SKU:
TMC-AP40TSS
Rating:
Shipping:
Calculated at checkout
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Executive Series AP40TSS
P-40 Tomahawk Tex Hill (signed on base plate)
Scale:
N/A
Length:
16"
Width:
18.5"
Composition:
Mahogany
SKU:
TMC-AP40TSS
Period:
World War II


Historical Note:

tmc.png

LIMITED-EDITION SIGNATURE SERIES

**ONLY ONE LEFT! THIS ITEM IS NO LONGER IN PRODUCTION**

*** Hand Signed on base plate by Pilot David Lee "Tex" Hill!

This collectable model P-40 Warhawk represents one of the early fighters with which U.S. forces faced the Japanese in World War II. Renowned as a tough aircraft and bearing one of the iconic paint schemes of the war, this 1/48-scale model P-40 Warhawk makes a great pilot gift or a present for any veteran, aviation enthusiast or history buff. Design work on the P-40 began in 1937, but numerous experimental versions were tested and refined before service deliveries began in September 1940. P-40s first saw wartime service with the British Commonwealth squadrons of the Desert Air Force in August 1941. Unable to outperform the top Japanese and German fighters of the day, the WarhawkåÕs tough build and good diving performance made it an effective warfighter. In 1941, the American Volunteer Group åÐ the Flying Tigers åÐ began combat operations in China against Japanese forces. In little more than six months, the Tigers shot down 229 Japanese aircraft and destroyed scores more on the ground. The P-40 saw service worldwide in World War II before being replaced by more modern fighters.

About David Lee "Tex"  Hill:       Hill earned his wings as a U.S. Naval Aviator in 1939 and joined the fleet as a TBD Devastator torpedo bomber pilot aboard the USS Saratoga before joining a Vought SB2U Vindicator dive bomber squadron aboard USS Ranger. In 1941, he was recruited with other Navy, Army and Marine Corps pilots to join the 1st American Volunteer Group (better known by its later nickname of the Flying Tigers). He learned to fly the P-40 in the AVG training program in Burma, and did well as a fighter pilot in the 2nd Pursuit Squadron (Panda Bear) as a flight leader and then squadron commander, becoming one of the top aces under the tutelage of Claire Chennault.

Hill landed his first kills on January 3, 1942 when he downed two Nates over the Japanese airfield at Tak, Thailand. He shot down two more on January 23, and became an ace on the 24th when he shot down a fighter and a bomber over Rangoon. In March, he succeeded Jack Newkirk as Squadron Leader of the Second Squadron. By the time the AVG was disbanded in the summer of 1942, Hill was a double ace, credited with 12 ¼ victories.

On May 7, 1942, the Japanese Army began building a pontoon bridge across the Salween River, which would allow them to move troops and supplies into China. To stem this tide, 2nd Squadron Leader Hill led a flight of four new P-40Es bombing and strafing into the mile deep gorge. During the next four days, the AVG pilots flew continuous missions into the gorge, effectively neutralizing the Japanese forces. From that day on, the Japanese never advanced farther than the west bank of the Salween. Claire Chennault would later write of these critical missions, "The American Volunteer Group had staved off China's collapse on the Salween."

On Thanksgiving Day 1943, he led a force of 12 B-25s, 10 P-38s, and 8 new P-51s from Saichwan, China, on the first strike against Formosa. The Japanese had 100 bombers and 100 fighters located at Shimchiku Airfield, and the bombers were landing as Hill’s force arrived. The enemy managed to get seven fighters airborne, but they were promptly shot down. Forty-two Japanese airplanes were destroyed, and 12 more were probably destroyed in the attack. The American force returned home with no casualties.

After the deactivation of the Flying Tigers in July 1942, Hill was one of only five Flying Tigers to join its USAAF successor, the USAAF 23rd Fighter Group, with the rank of major. He activated the 75th Fighter Squadron and later commanded the 23rd Fighter Group as a Colonel. Before returning to the states in late 1944, Hill and his P-51 scratched another six Japanese aircraft.

It is believed that he was the first to down a Zero with a P-51. Altogether, Hill was credited with destroying 18.25 enemy aircraft. The .25 kills comes from an assist; he and 3 other pilots worked together to shoot down a Nate.

In 1944, Hill returned to the U.S. and took command of the 412th Fighter Group, America's first operational jet fighter group flying the P-59 Airacomet and the P-80 Shooting Star. He separated from active service in 1945.

Postwar, in July 1946, Hill was asked by Texas Governor Coke Stevenson to activate and accept command of the 58th Wing of the Texas Air National Guard. Hill activated Guard units throughout the Gulf Coast and became the youngest Brigadier General in the history of the Guard. He once again saw combat during the Korean War with the Texas Air Guard.

He ended his military career in the Air Force Reserves, retiring as a Brigadier General. He holds the Distinguished Service Cross, Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross with three Oak Leaf Clusters, Presidential Unit Citation with Oak Leaf Cluster, Chinese Order of the Cloud and Banner 4th, 5th and 6th grades, 2-Star Wing Decorations, Chinese Victory Medal, Legion of Merit, and British Distinguished Flying Cross.

Info:       P-40 Tomahawk Tex Hill (signed on base plate)

 


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  1. Tex Hill ‘32 5 Star Review

    Posted by on 22nd May 2019

    I bought this autographed P40, because it was signed by a great Texas A&M “Aggie” Class of 1932. It will be donated for Coach Gary Blair’s children’s special Olympic charity fundraiser in 2020. Mr Hill was a WWII hero and veteran who went in harms way. He passed away in 2007 and this rate autographed model is beautiful and will help raise funds for a worthy charity. Thanks Aiken Company for a well packaged model with impeccable provenance.