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Yak-11 Moose Soviet Air Force, USSR 

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$17.95
SKU:
DAG-RA30
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De Agostini RA30
Yak-11 Moose Soviet Air Force, USSR
Scale:
N/A
Length:
4"
Width:
4.5"
Composition:
Plastic
SKU:
DAG-RA30


Historical Note:

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Historical:

Our worldwide searches have turned up another hot new collection of pre-assembled models for you, this one from comrades in Russia! Made of die cast metal with plastic detail parts, these Legendary Soviet aircraft cover everything from pre-WWII biplanes to late-20th century, Mach 2+ birds from Sukhoi and Mikoyan. The collection features:
  • Designed with a "fit the box" type of sizing, the models' longest dimensions vary from approximately 3 1/2"-6 1/2".
  • Airplane types from the 1930s through the end of the 20th century, which provides a fascinating retrospective on our ally-turned-Cold War adversary.
  • Display stands with aircraft types labeled in authentic Russian writing (Cyrillic).
  • Blister packaging.
  • Bargain pricing!

The Yakovlev Yak-11 (NATO reporting name: "Moose", Russian: _ø_¼-11) was a trainer aircraft used by the Soviet Air Force and other Soviet-influenced air forces from 1947 until 1962.

Info: Yak-11 Moose Soviet Air Force, USSR


Product Videos

Yakolev Yak-11 (03:16)
The Yakovlev Yak-11 (NATO reporting name: "Moose", Russian: Як-11) was a trainer aircraft used by the Soviet Air Force and other Soviet-influenced air forces from 1947 until 1962. The Yakovlev design bureau began work on an advanced trainer based on the successful Yak-3 fighter in mid 1944, although the trainer was of low priority owing to the ongoing Second World War. The first prototype of the new trainer, designated Yak-UTI or Yak-3UTI flew in late 1945. It was based on the radial-powered Yak-3U, but with the new Shvetsov ASh-21 seven-cylinder radial replacing the ASh-82 of the Yak-3U.It used the same all-metal wings as the Yak-3U, with a fuselage of mixed metal and wood construction. Pilot and observer sat in tandem under a long canopy with separate sliding hoods. A single synchronised UBS 12.7 mm machine gun and wing racks for two 100 kg (220 lb) bombs comprised the aircraft's armament. An improved prototype flew in 1946, with revised cockpits and a modified engine installation with the engine mounted on shock absorbing mounts.[2] This aircraft successfully passed state testing in October 1946, with production beginning at factories in Saratov and Leningrad in 1947.[4] Production Yak-11s were heavier than the prototypes, with later batches fitted with non-retractable tail wheels and revised propellers. A 7.62 mm ShKAS machine gun was sometimes fitted instead of the UBS, while some were fitted with rear-view periscopes above the windscreen.[4] In total, Soviet production amounted to 3,859 aircraft between 1947 and 1955. with a further 707 licence-built by Let in Czechoslovakia as the C-11.[5] Video and Audio content is Copyright © 2013 Malcolm Auld This video and audio material may not be reproduced in any form (except as an embedded video on any other website), without written permission.
  • Yakolev Yak-11
    The Yakovlev Yak-11 (NATO reporting name: "Moose", Russian: Як...

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